Symposia & Industry Hot Topics​

​SYMPOSIUM
Pulse Quality – A Farm to Ingredient Perspective

Thursday, June 24 | 10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. US Central Time

Plant protein market is driving the pulse sector. However, pulses in general are more than protein. The session will provide pulse scientists, ingredient manufacturers and product developers with information on quality as it relates to production (i.e., farm), storage and ingredients. The presentations in the session will address, in order, pulse production, genetic by environment (GXE) impacts on quality traits, impacts of storage environment (temperature and humidity) on quality, and ingredient quality characteristics. The focus overall will be placed on proximate composition and functionality of pulses.

Learning Objectives​

  • Attendees will be able to use the knowledge gained to communicate to raw material procurement staff the importance of genetic by environment impacts and storage environment on raw material quality.
  • Attendees will be able to assess potential pulse ingredient quality based on product characteristics.

Organizer

Clifford Hall, South Dakota State University Dairy and Food Science Department 

Speakers

  • Pulse quality and methods for measuring certain quality attributes
    Ning Wang, Canadian Grain Commission 
  • Breeding pea for improved quality
    Tom Warkentin, University of Saskatchewan
  • Impacts of Storage on Pulse Quality and Resulting Functionality
    Serap Vatansever, South Dakota State University 
  • Utilization of biological and physical methods to enhance the functional and nutritional attributes of pulse flours​
    Yongfeng Ai, University of Saskatchewan 

SYMPOSIUM
Paradigm shifts and technological innovations to meet grain security, supply chain resilience and market needs

Thursday, June 24 | 10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. US Central Time

Cereals and grain production have been facing unprecedented challenges in sustaining sufficient and safe food for the rapid global population growth. Pressures associated with pests/pathogens and environment coupled with water and land resource necessitate leveraging on new breeding tools and techniques, climate risk management, and innovating strategies to maintain quality and maximize yields. This symposium will discuss advances in technological innovations driving security and sustainability in consumable cereals and grains production.

Learning Objectives​

  • Technology evolution in grain processing and its impact on food security and quality.
  • Managing climate risks affecting yield and quality through artificial intelligence.
  • Utility of Rahman spectroscopy in grain science in revolutionizing breeding, crop protection, and processing of grains.

Organizers

Rusty C. Bautista, PhD, RiceTec, Inc. ​

Griffiths G. Atungulu, PhD, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture ​

Speakers

  • Automated process control and intelligent quality monitoring and sensing of grains: technology evolution and impact on food security
    Dr. John Lawrence​, Agi Suretrack 
  • Bolstering grain supply chain resilience: managing climate risks to maximize grain yield and quality
    Will Kletter, ClimateAI
  • Role and Evolution of Rahman spectrometry in grain science: unraveling structural organization of biological systems and revolutionize cereals and grain breeding, production, and processing
    Dr. Dmitry Kurouski, Biochemistry & Biophysics, Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M 


INDUSTRY HOT TOPIC
​Ensuring a Nutritious and Healthy Cereal and Grain Food Supply Resilient to Climate Change

Thursday, June 24 | 12:30 - 1:45 p.m. US Central Time

Despite the substantial progress made during the last several decades in reducing hunger, more than 800 million people are chronically undernourished and 2 billion people lack the essential micronutrients they need for a healthy status. Meanwhile, 500 million people are obese. FAO estimates that, to satisfy the growing demand driven by population growth and dietary changes, food production will have to increase by 60 percent by 2050. Importantly, climate change threatens to reverse the progress made so far in the fight against hunger and malnutrition. The aim of this symposium is to showcase some examples of adaptation in cereal and grain systems that support food security and healthy nutrition, keeping in mind that actual measures to be implemented are very system- and local context-specific. Cereal and grain crop lines that can survive and produce in future climates will be essential in future production systems. This symposium will pinpoint the need to revise the goals of breeding programmes, and the potential need for the introduction of cereal and grain varieties and breeds, even species, that have not previously been raised in a specific local area. This symposium will also provide recent insights about prospective health-promoting resilient crops in terms of dietary fiber and associated metabolites, the adaptation of resilient protein-rich crops (e.g. pulses, Andean grains), and the prominent establishment of protein-rich ingredients in a plant-based diet. There is an acute need for more research on how climate change is impacting agro-ecosystems, food security and our diets. Thus, this symposium, encompassing an equal combination of expert academics and industry representatives, will endeavor to provide the complementarity, option values and risk minimizing strategies that will become increasingly important in the future. 

Learning Objectives​

  • Pinpoint the need to revise the goals of breeding programmes, and the potential need for the introduction of cereal and grain varieties, breeds, even species in a specific local area
  • Provide recent insights about health-promoting crops resilient to climate change
  • Provide examples about the successful adaptation of resilient protein-rich crops (e.g. pulses, Andean grains), and the prominent establishment of protein-rich ingredients in a plant-based diet.

Organizer

Mario Martinez, Department of Food Science, Aarhus University 

Speakers

  • Matthew Reynolds, Distinguished Scientist and Head of Wheat Physiology, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)
  • Nese Sreenivasulu, Head of Consumer-driven Grain Quality and Nutrition Research Unit, Rice Breeding and Innovation Platform, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)
  • Sven-Erik Jacobsen, Executive Managing Director, Quinoa Quality ApS, and Associate Professor at Copenhagen University 
  • Mehmet Tulbek, Director - Research and Development, AGT Food and Ingredients Inc.

​SYMPOSIUM
Food Fermentation and Gut Health: Transforming Staple Foods into Superfoods

Thursday, September 23 | 10:45 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. US Central Time

In the last years, researchers have shown how gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in physical and mental health. The development of a healthy, stable, diverse and resilient gut microbiota begins at birth and continues during all life stages, hence after 3 years of age, lifestyle and dietary choices are paramount in shaping our gut bacteria community. Fermented foods that are both rich in prebiotics and probiotics are an important way to help consumers maintain their gut microbiota homeostasis. As an example, adding to the diet food that is rich in prebiotic compounds such as fibre-rich breads and sourdough breads is a very effective way to restore an imbalanced gut, keep a healthy one and positively influence a person's overall health and well-being status. Researchers now show that sourdough bread fermentation can directly influence the type and amount of prebiotic compounds (such as fibres) found in bread. As an example, by increasing dough acidity, sourdough fermentation contributes to the solubilization and degradation of long chain cereal fibres such as arabinoxylan (AX) into arabinoxylan-oligosaccharides (AXOS), highly valuable prebiotic compounds that extend their beneficial effects to the distal part of the colon, a part of the gut that is not a common prebiotic target. However, it is important to remember that local regulatory landscapes rarely match scientific findings, which often slows down scientific knowledge translation into new product development.

Learning Objectives​

By attending this session, participants will gain additional insight on the following topics:
  • Importance of gut health in the modern society.
  • The use of fermentation to transform staple food into health promoting food.
  • Role of cereals, dietary fibres and carbohydrates in maintaining gut homeostasis
  • The role of sourdough bread as staple food on preserving/restoring gut microbiota healthy balance.
  • The role of specific bread ingredients such as prebiotic fibres and sourdough on supporting healthy gut community.
  • Gut health regulatory framework challenges and opportunities (focus on selected countries)​​

Organizer

Bram Pareyt, Puratos NV ​